Grow Difficulties; Fertilize Them With Procrastination

» Posted by on Jul 18, 2014 in Coaching, Human Interest, Humor, Inspiration, Personal Development, Self-help, Wisdom | 0 comments

It is 10 a.m. on Saturday morning.  It’s already 90 degrees, with humidity that makes if feel like 100.  I’m just cooling down after spreading mulch in my flower beds for three hours. Arising at 6 a.m. I started before it got hot–it was only 80 then.

While I was sweating away at this project and shoveling mulch into my wheelbarrow from the pile that had been in my yard for over a year, I remembered what John Mason said: “Procrastination is the fertilizer that makes difficulties grow.”

I could have finished this project last fall, when it was cooler. I could have finished this project last winter, when it was much cooler. I could have finished this project in the spring, when it was cooler. But I didn’t.  I procrastinated.

Did procrastination make this project more difficult? Yes. It did.  Instead of rising at a decent hour and working leisurely for a day in cooler weather, I spread the work over five days, starting at 6 a.m. and sweating like a field hand until my clothes were soaked.

If I know so much that I write articles advising people not to procrastinate, why did I procrastinate?  I can think of only one reason that makes any sense: It’s just my nature.

I did prove, however, that John Mason knows what he is talking about.  “Procrastination is the fertilizer that makes difficulties grow.”

When duty comes a knocking at your gate,
Welcome him in, for if you bid him wait,
He’ll depart only to come once more
And bring seven other duties to your door.
–Edwin Markum

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